The Bad Plus drummer David King was all over his drum kit Friday night at Theatre at Meydenbauer Center as the Bellevue Jazz Festival continues. What a great show they put on. David King was outstanding as was bassist Reid Anderson, pianist Ethan Iverson.

For tickets and more information go to the Festival website; Bellevue Jazz Festival

Forget categories and catch phrases. The sound of The Bad Plus is distinctive, eclectic and formidable. The Bad Plus have exploded all notions of what a jazz piano trio should sound like, whether at outdoor rock festivals, jazz clubs or symphony halls.

The Bad Plus is a collective made up of bassist Reid Anderson, pianist Ethan Iverson, and drummer David King. All three are from the Midwest and they have known each other since their teens. Nonetheless, with the exception of one unimpressive meeting in 1990, it is only after spending their formative 20s apart — King as member of the seminal indie jazz group Happy Apple, Iverson as the musical director for the Mark Morris Dance Group, Anderson as a prominent up-and-coming player on the New York jazz scene — that they reunited in late 2000 to play a weekend club date in Minneapolis. The chemistry was immediate and obvious. They planned a second gig and a one-day recording session for the indie jazz label Fresh Sound and The Bad Plus was born.

The Los Angeles Times ranked the trio among the leaders of what might be called the Nu Jazz movement. Newsweek declared their 2005 release Suspicious Activity? to be “among the freshest sounding albums of the year”. And according to Rolling Stone, “by any standard, jazz or otherwise, this is mighty, moving music, hot players with hard-rock hearts”. In short, a diverse array of music lovers has been seduced by The Bad Plus and their earnest, dizzying musicianship.




The Los Angeles Times ranked the trio among the leaders of what might be called the Nu Jazz movement. Newsweek declared their 2005 release Suspicious Activity? to be “among the freshest sounding albums of the year”. And according to Rolling Stone, “by any standard, jazz or otherwise, this is mighty, moving music, hot players with hard-rock hearts”. In short, a diverse array of music lovers has been seduced by The Bad Plus and their earnest, dizzying musicianship.  Jazz Photography by Daniel Sheehan, Seattle Photographer.

The sewcond evening of the Bellevue Jazz Festival continued with quite a number of different performances in varied venues around town. Above is the Josh Rawlings trio playing inside the new Neiman Marcus. I love the setting. The music sounded great there too,

Over at Grand Cru Wine Bar at TEN20 the Bill Anschell Duo with Jeff Johnson on bass played a great set.

For tickets and more information go to the Festival website; Bellevue Jazz Festival More Pictures to come from Friday evening.

Jazz Photography by Seattle photographer Daniel Sheehan, who photographs jazz performances, and creates portrait photography for publications and Seattle Wedding Photography with an artistic photojournalist style. See more work from this Seattle Photographer.

Once again the Bellevue Jazz Festival is here and kicking it off at the Meydenbauer Theater was The Seattle Repertory Jazz Orchestra (SRJO), the Northwest’s premier big band jazz ensemble. Meanwhile all over Bellevue, groups were performing free concerts at varous venues. Here Gail Pettis performed with Randy Halberstadt on keyboards at Grand Cru Wine Bar at TEN20.

For tickets and more information go to the Festival website;   Bellevue Jazz Festival

Pianist June Tonkin performed a set at El Gaucho Bellevue. Both of these performances were wonderful each in a different setting.Live music is great.

Jazz Photography by Seattle photographer Daniel Sheehan, who photographs jazz performances, and creates portrait photography for publications and Seattle Wedding Photography with an artistic photojournalist style. See more work from this Seattle Photographer.

Once again the Bellevue Jazz Festival is here and kicking it off at the Meydenbauer Theater was The Seattle Repertory Jazz Orchestra (SRJO), the Northwest’s premier big band jazz ensemble. Founded in 1995, the 17-piece big band is made up of the most prominent jazz soloists and band leaders in the greater Seattle area. SRJO played a concert of highlights from their 2009-2010 concert season, including hits from their November 2009 “Tribute to Ray Charles” concert (“One Mint Julep,” “Moanin”), their March 2010 “Big Band Monk and Mingus” concert (“Haitian Fight Song” by Mingus, “Misterioso” by Monk), their April 2010 “Birth of the Cool” concert (Boplicity, Rocker), and a new Michael Brockman composition for the SRJO titled “Passage Noir.” Featured soloists included trumpeter Jay Thomas, baritone saxophonist Bill Ramsay, pianist Randy Halberstadt, tenor saxophonist Hadely Caliman and Travis Ranney, trombonists Dan Marcus and David Marriott, plus alto saxophonists Mark Taylor and Michael Brockman.
Here are some highlights from the concert.



For tickets and more information go to the Festival website; Bellevue Jazz Festival

Jazz Photography by Seattle photographer Daniel Sheehan, who photographs jazz performances, and creates portrait photography for publications and Seattle Wedding Photography with an artistic photojournalist style. See more work from this Seattle Photographer.

Seattle’s Garfield High School, under the direction of Clarence Acox, took top honors on Monday, May 10th in New York at Jazz at Lincoln Center’s 15th Annual Essentially Ellington High School Jazz Band Competition & Festival. The school, based in Seattle’s historic Central District, made competition history, becoming the first band ever to win the competition four times. Last year, the band also took top honors.
Garfield was selected as the winner by a panel of judges composed of distinguished jazz musicians and historians – Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Artistic Director Wynton Marsalis; composer, conductor, and Ellington authority David Berger; leading Mary Lou Williams scholar Ted Buehrer; legendary jazz saxophonist and composer/arranger Jimmy Heath; and bassist and educator Rodney Whitaker – from among the 15 finalist bands from the U.S. and Canada that completed in the competition. At the awards ceremony, Marsalis presented Acox with the 1st place trophy and an award of $5,000. Scott Brown, Director of Seattle’s Roosevelt High School Jazz Band, accepted the award for honorable mention band and received an award of $750. Another Seattle-area band, Edmonds-Woodway high school also competed.
Celebration concert by the Garfield and Roosevelt HighSchool Jazz Bands on Wednesday, June 9, 7:30pm, McCaw Hall at Seattle Center. Suggested donation $20 at the door, proceeds will benefit the high school music programs and the Seattle Center Foundation.